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May 2014 Newsletter

Volume 1


In this Issue

Inspire Democracy – How the website will help you

New Research

  1. Who Participates? A Closer Look at the Results of the National Youth Survey
  2. What Parties Do to Engage and Mobilize Youth: A Literature Review of Five Countries
  3. Generational Change: Looking at Declining Youth Voter Turnout over Time

Tell us what you are doing

Have you recently conducted research on youth civic participation? Let us know and we'll include your research or information on our site.

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Voter turnout by first-time electors, 1965–2011

Graph of voter turnout linking to full report

Research and Tools to Inspire Democracy

Elections Canada is pleased to launch Inspire Democracy, an initiative that includes a new website hosting research and tools to encourage youth civic engagement in Canada. This first newsletter provides more information on what you will find on the site.

How will the website help me?

The Inspire Democracy website is designed to give you easy access to research on youth. This includes everything from voter turnout and voter registration data to studies on civic participation, facts on Millennials and how political parties engage with youth, the impact of civic education and mobilization techniques. You will also find links to others in the engagement community and tools for getting young people involved in democratic life.

We hope this research will help inspire and inform your own outreach activities. With the 2015 federal election fast approaching, we can begin to build a network of organizations dedicated to supporting youth civic engagement in Canada.

New Research from Elections Canada

Who Participates? A Closer Look at the Results of the National Youth Survey

Professor François Gélineau takes a fresh look at the results of the National Youth Survey, comparing the drivers of political participation among different age groups, between students and non-students, and across provinces and territories. He also explores how political knowledge, political interest and knowledge of the electoral process affect the decision to vote or not to vote.

Read the report

What Parties Do to Engage and Mobilize Youth: A Literature Review of Five Countries

How are parties engaging youth, and what can we learn from their efforts? Samara reviews the literature on party mobilization in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Finland. The authors also tell us about what kinds of mobilization tactics work best.

Read the report

Generational Change: Looking at Declining Youth Voter Turnout over Time

Professor Peter Loewen provides an updated analysis on turnout across generations.

Read the report